Author Topic: Painting the bird  (Read 6875 times)

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Offline GlennBob

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Painting the bird
« on: August 08, 2007, 01:29:41 AM »
Anybody have any ideas as to how to hang a single wing for painting ?

I'm painting mine in pieces, and starting with the wing, but how do you hang it ?

I took a two foot rod and put in down the wiring chase in the front side of the wing, and plan to hang the other side on a couple bolts in the bolt holes.  I hope it's not too much stress on the forward side of the wing in the chase ! !

Glennbob
N600EZ  O-320-E2A,  Hertzler prop, Trio AP, Narco HSI, Custom headers, Oil heat.

Offline Bruce Hughes

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Painting the bird
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2007, 11:43:25 AM »
HI Glennbob

Forgive me but I don't know which canard you are building.
It could make a difference.

If it is a Longeze, you should have a hole through the wing
close to the winglet for a tiedown.   Some people don't have
one but many do.

Bruce Hughes   :D
Yelm, WA
Longeze N199BH
retired
taught at Maui Community College

Offline crouch

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wing painting
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2007, 02:01:44 PM »
What I did was mount a 4x4 on a piece of plywood (all scrap stuff). The 4x4 was braced vertically on the plywood with 3/4 inch metal conduit anchored top and bottom-three directions. I then got a heavy duty Simpson right angled post anchor and attached a 2x6 that was bolted to the wing in two places (inside and one outside). The winglet end was supported with a similar post that had a bolt with rubber end that was placed in the position light hole. Re-enforce the inside of this opening with some flox.
Now with a large bolt in the Simpson anchor I was able to rotate the wing and paint the entire top, bottom and winglet in one session.
It's kinda wordy, but I hope this helps.

Steve Crouch
SoCal KWHP
LEZ painted and starting wiring.

Offline crouch

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wing painting
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2007, 02:02:32 PM »
What I did was mount a 4x4 on a piece of plywood (all scrap stuff). The 4x4 was braced vertically on the plywood with 3/4 inch metal conduit anchored top and bottom-three directions. I then got a heavy duty Simpson right angled post anchor and attached a 2x6 that was bolted to the wing in two places (inside and one outside). The winglet end was supported with a similar post that had a bolt with rubber end that was placed in the position light hole. Re-enforce the inside of this opening with some flox.
Now with a large bolt in the Simpson anchor I was able to rotate the wing and paint the entire top, bottom and winglet in one session.
It's kinda wordy, but I hope this helps.

Steve Crouch
SoCal KWHP
LEZ painted and starting wiring.

Offline GlennBob

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Wing Painting
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2007, 10:43:23 PM »
Thanks guys for the response.

Steve,

 I'm not sure what the simpson post hole thingie is but I basically got the concept.  I hadn't thought of reinforcing the position light hole.  I ran a solid steel rod 1/2"  by about 24"  down that hole.  I was afraid of damaging the wing.

Bruce,

As for the hole near the winglet,  I don't have one yet,  do plan to drill one,  but I don't think it would work to have something in there while I'm trying to paint.

I have a long-ez.

Thanks  Gents.

Glennbob
N600EZ  O-320-E2A,  Hertzler prop, Trio AP, Narco HSI, Custom headers, Oil heat.

Offline Bruce Hughes

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Painting the bird
« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2007, 10:29:16 AM »
Hi Glennbob

I hang a lot of things from the ceiling on ratchet straps.   Gives you a
lot of flexibility.   During painting you would have to do some moving,
though.   Depends on how much help you have from others.  Be sure
your ceiling is strong.    :D

Bruce Hughes   8)
Yelm, WA
Longeze N199BH
retired
taught at Maui Community College

Offline GlennBob

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Painting the bird
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2007, 11:25:19 PM »
Waiter,

Or anyone else who might know.  

I read the article from the Canard Zone about finishing a plane.  The author makes the point that the whole wing should be done at one time rather than just doing spots here and there and sanding your life away.  I would like to do larger sections, but my poxy sets up too fast.  I can't get that large a batch mixed and applied before it sets up.  I'm using the West system, 105 Resin, 206 (slow) hardner.  I can't get much more than three squirts mixed with micro before it starts getting too stiff to spread.  Is there a different hardner that would allow more time to apply ?

Thanks for your response.

Glennbob
N600EZ  O-320-E2A,  Hertzler prop, Trio AP, Narco HSI, Custom headers, Oil heat.

Offline Bruce Hughes

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Painting the bird
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2007, 11:40:11 AM »
Hi Glennbob

West System is pretty bad about exotherms.   You must stir, stir,
stir, stir, stir.   This will get rid of SOME of the heat generated
in the hardener/epoxy reaction.   Apply a little of the mix and
THEN STIR AGAIN.

If you can accurately control the temperature of the epoxy BEFORE
you mix the 2, you will get a slower reaction.   I guess your problem
is in the summer.   You could try keeping the epoxy at 60 degrees
with a good temp control system (put the epoxy can in a big, flat pan,
shallow layer of cool water, maybe a few ice cubes, and an accurate
 thermometer (WHICH YOU WATCH).  You should support the epoxy
can so it does not tip over and get water inside.   This has to be done
right or your temperature control will not be accurate.

No, you cannot mix BIG batches.    :(

Bruce Hughes   :D
Yelm, WA
Longeze N199BH
retired
taught at Maui Community College

Offline GlennBob

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Painting
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2007, 12:48:49 AM »
Bruce,

Thanks for your response.  I seem to remember some guys saying to make sure the resin is stored warm enough ! !   One guy I know keeps his in a cabinet with a light bulb in it ! !   But, . . that could have been in the winter,  I don't remember.

As for the quantity,  you mentioned that one cannot mix big batches, . .but the article I read from George, . . ( Russian I think, last name ) said to mix it in a large salad bowl ! ! ! That would be enough to do the whole wing ! !

I'm wondering if he's using different materials than I am.

Glennbob
N600EZ  O-320-E2A,  Hertzler prop, Trio AP, Narco HSI, Custom headers, Oil heat.

Offline Bruce Hughes

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Painting the bird
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2007, 07:06:43 PM »
Hi Glennbob and others

Epoxies do tend to crystallize out if they are cold for a long time.
The solution to that problem is put the can in some hot water for
several hours.   BE CAREFUL THAT THE CAN DOES NOT TURN OVER;
YOU DON'T WANT WATER IN THE EPOXY.  The crystals dissolve and
it is still good to use.

I never had that problem with West System because I use it up too
fast.   My Aeropoxy sits around more.

You can avoid that by keeping it warm enough for you to be comfortable;
in the pantry (your wife will love that), in the closet, under the bed, etc.

Nothing happens to the hardener, I think, at reasonable hot or cold temps.

Big batches:  I never mixed very big batches because I did not have
anyone to help me; you have to stir vigorously and try to spread it at
the same time.   Big batches work if you have someone to stir to get
the heat out while you spread.   The warmer the weather, the bigger
the problem.

Of course I am speaking of the West System.   Aeropoxy is never a
exotherm problem because it reacts much slower at any temp.

Good luck.    :D

Bruce Hughes
Yelm, WA
Longeze N199BH
retired
taught at Maui Community College

Offline newezeowner

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Re: Painting the bird
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2010, 06:49:53 PM »
FYI for those using west and their 206 hardner and still not having enough time. They do make a tropical hardener as well that is meant for warmer climates and longer working times (almost twice 206). We used it a lot in boatbuilding. The number is 209.

Be aware though that if you use it in low temperatures you might as well come back in a couple days. :)

Drew