Author Topic: heavy feet  (Read 3377 times)

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Offline pharroah

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heavy feet
« on: May 15, 2008, 09:11:30 AM »
I finally got my LEZ and I'm having a blast.  Should have done this years ago.  I have a question that might seem pretty stupid, but on the flight from CO to Arkansas, I found myself with feet resting on the rudder pedals, creating drag.  I ended up dorsiflexing my feet for 2.5 hours to avoid this which became quite uncomfortable.  What do you guys do with your feet to prevent this?

Offline flyingwaldo

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heavy feet
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2008, 10:10:13 AM »
Are you actually pushing and activating the rudders?  It takes some push at cruise speed.  If you have the stock pedals they are designed so you can move your feet around and past them.  Mine are not and had to be moved.....

Offline Bill James

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heavy feet
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2008, 11:00:49 AM »
Congrats on your Long EZ.
I believe the rudders are intended to be installed vertical,
positioned for optimal operation during landing or maneuvering rather than comfort.  
During the restricted period i adjusted the rudder cables away from the initial position
some and arrived at a good comprimise for me.

While one would assume your rudder pedals are correct,
for a good starting point you might become more familiar with the intended design
versus your installation and consider an adjustment. Minimal labor and the price is right  :)

I believe you described the two position options we are all familiar with, either on or through the pedals.
For consideration by new builders, I have a third option of pulling my knees up aft of the instrument panel.
I built the leg openings two inches higher with the top of the instrument panel also built two inches higher.

As for seating in cruise, i have a lower two inch false bottom floor under my upholstery, and an upper wedge made of the
console foam and glass that makes the actual seat back angle 37 degrees rather than the plans' steeper angle.
It is about two inches thick at the top and goes to nothing about 4 inches above the fuselage floor,
above the protective tail bone hard point opposite the speed brake bulkhead.

My main offering here- at least one person reported getting his shoestring caught on the rudder,
 and only after significant effort getting the foot loose and back in position for landing.
I keep lightweight slip-on shoes in the plane and use them most flights.
Good flying-
Bill James, Fort Worth VariEze N95BJ
Downdraft Plenums, QuickCowls
There was supposed to be anhedral?
ATP, Society of Flight Test Engineers

Offline pharroah

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heavy feet
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2008, 11:20:55 AM »
Thanks for the responses.  I'll give these ideas a try.  I think with some different shoes I might be able to get around the pedals.  I doubt that I was exerting enough pressure to be a real problem, but I'm not sure and it would be nice to find a comfortable position that eliminated this issue.  Pretty small complaint in the scheme of things.

Offline Gilbert DRIEUX

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heavy feet
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2008, 09:14:39 PM »
Quote from: Sonset

My main offering here- at least one person reported getting his shoestring caught on the rudder,
 and only after significant effort getting the foot loose and back in position for landing.
I keep lightweight slip-on shoes in the plane and use them most flights.
Good flying-

Yes !
Have lightweight shoes WITHOUT SHOESTRING !
Have ground "training" moving your feet from "trough" position to "on".
The springs which brough back the pedals must be strong enough to keep the pedals in posistion while you move your feet back to "on" posistion......

Gilbert.
F-PMPZ
Gilbert
VE N 1736
F-PMPZ
Lyc O-235 C2C
@ LFPK / France